Look & Learn: The meaning behind Australia’s flags

3/4J thanks to Mr Andrew here is this weeks homework. Our flag has great importance I’d like to see what you think.

3/4A CLASSROOM

All countries have flags and symbols that represent the country and their people. Two of Australia’s most important symbols are the national flag and the Aboriginal flag. What do these flags mean and why do they look the way they do.

Look at the images below and click on the link to learn more about the Australian flag and Aboriginals flag.

http://www.gostudy.com.au/blog/the-australian-flag/

Complete the following tasks in as much detail as possible.

– Explain the features and meanings on the Australian flag.

– Explain the features and meanings on the Aboriginal flag.

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  One thought on “Look & Learn: The meaning behind Australia’s flags

  1. Peace
    February 16, 2015 at 8:22 am

    Bonjour ,Madame Joyce

    – Explain the features and meanings on the Australian flag.

    The Union Jack stands for when British discovered and claimed Australia.

    The Federation star is for our 6 states and territories.

    The Southern Cross is a group of stars that yuo can see in Australia.

    Explain the features and meanings on the Aboriginal flag.

    Black- represents the people of Aboriginal culture. 🙂 😉

    Sorry Madame Joyce I couldn’t finish but I will finish it tomorrow

    Au revoir Madame Joyce 😉 🙂

    • Peace
      February 17, 2015 at 7:06 am

      Bonjour Madame Joyce,

      Red: represents the earth and spiritual relation to the land.
      Yellow: Represents the Sun, the giver of life and protector.
      😉

  2. Ethan -_-
    February 16, 2015 at 10:00 am

    The Australian Flag – the Australian flag has the union jack, which represents that Australia is a member of the Commonwealth.
    The stars represent the Southern Cross which is a constellation seen above Australia. The seven-sided stars are known as Commonwealth stars and represent our states and territories. They are seven-sided from when Papua New Guinea was also considered a colony of Australia.
    The Aboriginal Flag – The black represents the Aboriginal people, the red represents the earth and their spiritual relationship to the land. The yellow is the sun, giver of life.

  3. Irmak
    February 18, 2015 at 2:49 am

    5

    The iconic symbols of Australia include the Sydney Opera House, the boomerang, the kangaroo and the emu. But what about the Australian national flag? Like any other flag the Australian flag is full of symbolism and stirs pride in Australians, young and old alike.

    The origins of the flag are plain to see: Australia was settled by the British in 1788 and remained a colony until its independence in 1901. However, Australia remains a member of the Commonwealth and, as such, has chosen to retain the British Union Flag in the national flag.

    The 6 stars represent the Southern Cross constellation which have, by themselves, grown to become a very commonly seen symbol of Australia. This constellation is very prominent in the southern hemisphere and clearly visible in the night sky above Australia.

    Each of the stars is seven-pointed and are known as Commonwealth Stars. Originally there were six points to represent the 6 colonies that made up Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia, Northern Territory and South Australia). Later they were changed to 7 points to represent the extra colony of Papua New Guinea, which was at the time a dependent territory.

    Most countries use the colours in their flag as their national colours, but not Australia. Australia’s national colours – as used in sport and elsewhere – are the vibrant green and gold, not the red, white and blue of the flag. This is almost certainly a move away from the colours that are found in the British flag.

    The future of the Australian flag is up for debate. Could a new flag with the green and gold colours, the distinctive shapes of a kangaroo and a boomerang replace the ex-colonial look of the current flag? A referendum on becoming a republic is currently not high on the political agenda in Australia, but surely it’s only a matter of time.

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  4. Lochana
    February 18, 2015 at 2:50 am

    The 6 stars represent the Southern Cross constellation which have, by themselves, grown to become a very commonly seen symbol of Australia. This constellation is very prominent in the southern hemisphere and clearly visible in the night sky above Australia:)

  5. Joshua
    February 19, 2015 at 3:33 am

    The iconic symbols of Australia include the Sydney Opera House, the boomerang, the kangaroo and the emu. But what about the Australian national flag? Like any other flag the Australian flag is full of symbolism and stirs pride in Australians, young and old alike.

    The origins of the flag are plain to see: Australia was settled by the British in 1788 and remained a colony until its independence in 1901. However, Australia remains a member of the Commonwealth and, as such, has chosen to retain the British Union Flag in the national flag.

    The 6 stars represent the Southern Cross constellation which have, by themselves, grown to become a very commonly seen symbol of Australia. This constellation is very prominent in the southern hemisphere and clearly visible in the night sky above Australia.

    Each of the stars is seven-pointed and are known as Commonwealth Stars. Originally there were six points to represent the 6 colonies that made up Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia, Northern Territory and South Australia). Later they were changed to 7 points to represent the extra colony of Papua New Guinea, which was at the time a dependent territory.

    Most countries use the colours in their flag as their national colours, but not Australia. Australia’s national colours – as used in sport and elsewhere – are the vibrant green and gold, not the red, white and blue of the flag. This is almost certainly a move away from the colours that are found in the British flag.

    The future of the Australian flag is up for debate. Could a new flag with the green and gold colours, the distinctive shapes of a kangaroo and a boomerang replace the ex-colonial look of the current flag? A referendum on becoming a republic is currently not high on the political agenda in Australia, but surely it’s only a matter of time.

  6. Peace
    April 1, 2015 at 3:09 am

    Did you type that all by your self Irmack

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